About Me

 

Me sepia ish

Jane Palm-Gold is an artist and historian living in St. Giles, London.

After graduating from the Royal College of Art in 1988, she worked as an animation director for The Unit at MGMM, directing music videos before moving to work in the not for profit sector. She researched, created and curated the HIV/AIDS public health awareness exhibitions Chances: An Exhibition of Safer Sex at London Lighthouse and Loving & Living at Smiths Gallery, London, commissioned by Positively Women and the Immune Development Trust. This exhibition went on to feature at Princess Diana’s Concert for Hope, Wembley Arena in 1993.

As a designer and illustrator her clients include the Department of Health, Health Education Authority, Body Positive, Red Ribbon International, Culham College Institute, Muscular Dystrophy UK, MS Society and the National Asthma Campaign.

In 2005, she became consumed by 18th and 19th century London history, especially that of her local area of St. Giles. Six years of research led to the publicly acclaimed London’s Underworld Unearthed: The Secret Life of the Rookery exhibition with Museum of London Archaeology, in 2011.

Her latest exhibition, Regeneration City Blues previewed at Leeds College of Art in March, 2015 and is scheduled for London this August. Created from three years research, it explores the impact of city regeneration by corporate multinationals upon pre-existing shops and businesses and established local creative and cultural activity.

The exhibition highlights the fact that our historical, social and cultural importance of ‘sense of place’ is being obliterated in certain city areas, leaving cities gentrified – but at what cost?